Bookstores Comeback

Whoo-hoo! Sales are up 10% over last year in brick and mortar bookstores!

Facing economic gloom and competition from cheap e-readers, brick-and-mortar booksellers entered this holiday season with the humblest of expectations.

But the initial weeks of Christmas shopping, a boom time for the book business, have yielded surprisingly strong sales for many bookstores, which report that they have been lifted by an unusually vibrant selection; customers who seem undeterred by pricier titles; and new business from people who used to shop at Borders, the chain that went out of business this year.

via New York Times

I wonder if other people’s experiences are like mine. When I bought my new kobo a year ago, I was enamoured of it and ereading. While the romance lasted, I had no use for paper books and craved ebooks. But like any infatuation, it passed and took its proper place in the scheme of things. I’m back to reading paper books and using my ereader for convenience when traveling.

There is nothing more relaxing than reading a book in the tub.

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11 thoughts on “Bookstores Comeback

  1. I agree, Lilian – there is nothing like a visit to my favorite independent bookshop, and there is nothing like a good book and a pot of tea on a long winter night. Ereaders just don’t work the same magic.

  2. I have only the free Kindle for PC download, and I have quite a few books on it. I like it, and the speed with which I can get a book I want from Amazon.
    But it will never replace a “real” book, and I will always want both format. Generally, I prefer manuals and how-to non-fiction on the ebook reader, and fiction I want to refer to for my own writing. Treasured fiction is something I want to hold in my hand.

  3. Cate–I love the way you put that. It’s hard to put kindle and magic in the same sentence.

    Sheila that’s interesting, I find non-fiction even harder electronically.

  4. Yay! You know I’m a diehard paper fan. I mean, I’m very happy for people to love their ereaders, but I do so hope that they never take over the market at the expense of real books. Looks hopeful that they won’t.

    1. There’s room for everything–and it’s even possible that some kids may become readers through ereading and then turn to paper books from there.

      1. That’s true. From my experience as a librarian, though, it seems to me that it’s mostly the older crowd who like ereaders – those who already have a house full of book, time and money to travel, and like the fact that you can increase text size!
        Often, when I tell teens that the book they want is out in paper format, but they can download it as an ebook, they look at me askance, and ask to reserve the “real” book!
        There is hope yet.

        1. How interesting Sheila–thanks for posting that.

  5. I find I use my ereader a lot still, but mostly because often it is the cheapest way for me to get a book. I try very hard to support local Swiss bookshops, and for my French book buying I almost always buy in-store. But for English books, my choice is so limited, and I read so much that to order everything from abroad would absolutely break my book budget. My ereader has really helped actually. Having said that, I buy paper if it’s something I want to take notes in and keep.

    1. Michelle–oh yes I didn’t think about that. Ereaders bring books to people in places where paperbooks aren’t easily or widely available. The more reading the better! I so admire you and other prolific readers.

  6. My experience was definitely like yours. I read a lot on my Nook for a while, and then less and less. But I still want it for traveling and for special instances when the ebook makes sense (when I check them out of the library or get them from Netgalleys). I want access to both, but most books I read will be on paper.

    1. Yes–I want to keep mine for all those reasons, also convenient for taking to kids’ hockey games or swimming lessons.

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